Your shopping cart is empty.

Ph. +61 2 6931 8252

Listing of Legal Australian R/C Frequencies


Radio Communications (Radio-controlled Models) Class Licence 2002

The AUSTRALIAN COMMUNICATIONS AUTHORITY issues this Class Licence under subsection 132 (1) and section 135 of the Radiocommunications Act 1992.

Dated 7 February 2002

Australian Communications Authority

 

1Name of Class Licence

This Class Licence is the Radiocommunications (Radio-controlled Models) Class Licence 2002.

2 When Class Licence comes into force

This Class Licence comes into force on gazettal.

3 Definitions

In this Class Licence:

Act means the Radiocommunications Act 1992.

device compliance day, for a radiocommunications device used to control model aircraft, model landcraft or model watercraft, means the most recent of the following days:

(a) if the radiocommunications device was manufactured in Australia the day the radiocommunications device was manufactured;

(b) if the radiocommunications device was manufactured overseas and imported the day it was imported;

(c)if the radiocommunications device was altered or modified in a material respect the day it was altered or modified.

29 MHz band means the frequency band greater than 29.72 MHz and not exceeding 30 MHz.

36 MHz bandmeans the frequency band greater than 36 MHz and not exceeding 36.6 MHz.

Note: For definitions of other expressions used in this Class Licence, see the Act, the Radiocommunications Regulations 1993 and the Radiocommunications (Interpretation) Determination 2000.

4 Revocation

For section 135 of the Act, the Radiocommunications Class Licence (Radio-controlled Models), notified in the Gazette on 24 July 1996, is revoked.

5 Class Licence

(1) Subject to sections 6, 7 and 8, this Class Licence authorises any person to operate a radiocommunications device to control model aircraft, model landcraft or model watercraft.

(2) In sections 6, 7 and 8, radiocommunications device means a radiocommunications device to which this Class Licence applies.

6 Condition interference

The operation of a radiocommunications device must not cause interference to the operation of radiocommunications services.

Note   A radiocommunications device to which this Class Licence applies will not be afforded protection from interference caused by other radiocommunications devices.

A radiocommunications device operated under this Class Licence is generally not expected to suffer interference. However, a radiocommunications device to which this Class Licence applies may experience, from other radiocommunications devices, interference arising from the particular circumstances of the operation of the radiocommunications device to which this Class Licence applies.

7 Conditions 29 MHz band or 36 MHz band

The operation of a radiocommunications device that operates in the 29 MHz band or 36 MHz band is subject to the following conditions:

(a) the radiocommunications device must operate on a carrier frequency in the 29 MHz band or the 36 MHz band, with a maximum EIRP greater than 300 milliwatts and not exceeding 1 watt;

(b) subject to paragraph (c), if the radiocommunications device is operated on a carrier frequency in the 36 MHz band, it may do so only on a carrier frequency obtained by using the formula:

where n is a whole number that is at least 1 and not exceeding 30;

(c) a carrier frequency using the formula specified in paragraph (b) may be used only for operation of a radiocommunications device that is used to control model aircraft or model watercraft;

(d) if a radiocommunications device is used to control model aircraft on a carrier frequency in the 36 MHz band, it may, in addition to being permitted to operate on a carrier frequency using the formula specified in paragraph (b), be operated on a carrier frequency obtained by using the formula:

where n is a whole number that is at least 1 and not exceeding 29.

8 Standards

If the device compliance day for a radiocommunications device occurs on or after the day on which this Class Licence comes into force, the radiocommunications device must comply with any standard applicable to it as in force on that day.

Note 1: The ACA wishes to make it clear that if a standard mentioned in this section is amended or replaced by another standard following the device compliance day for the radiocommunications device, the radiocommunications device need not comply with the amended or replaced standard.

Note 2: Section 5 of the Act definesstandardto mean a standard made under section 162 of the Act.

 

MODEL AERONAUTICAL ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALIA

The MAAA governs all model aircraft activity in Australia, co-ordinating the activities of the various State Associations, the requirements of the FAI and the numerous Government departments involved in regulating Model Aircraft activities in Australia.

The MAAA is therefore responsible for the safe operation of model aircraft in Australia as called for under the terms of responsible self-government in sporting activities. A vital part of the MAAA management structure is the Frequency Sub-committee. This group is responsible for examining and advising on all matters pertaining to frequency management within the MAAA umbrella.

Recently the Frequency sub-committee was asked to examine the feasibility of operating models on transmitters spaced 10kHz apart. This resulted in approval by the MAAA for 10kHz operation but under carefully controlled conditions. These conditions are summarised in the MAAA Frequency Directive No. 5. See the MAAA web page for details.

The tables and notes below list pertinent operational points and the approved operating frequencies within the legal Australian frequency bands.

 

MAAA APPROVED FREQUENCIES WITHIN THE CLASS LICENCE FREQUENCY BAND ALLOCATIONS

Radio Controlled Model Aircraft can only operate legally in Australia on frequencies approved by the Australian Communications Authority. The frequency bands approved by the M.A.A.A. are26.957 - 27.282MHz, 29.720 - 30.000MHz, 36.000 - 36.600MHz and 40.660 - 40.700MHz. It should be noted that the assigned centre frequencies for operation are at least 5kHz removed from the band edges.Frequencies other than those identified above are not recommended to be used at any field operated by the M.A.A.A., any State Association, Club, or any M.A.A.A. affiliated member. To do so may invalidate any insurance cover provided by the M.A.A.A. To view MOP 013 governing use of 29, 36 and 40MHz click on the link below:

http://www.maaa.asn.au/maaa/mop/procedures/MOP013%20-%20Proc%20FREQUENCY...

This Frequency Directive MOP 013 only applies to the 29, 36 and 40 MHz bands. 27 MHz and 2.4 GHz are now also approved by the M.A.A.A. and reference should be made to MOP 048 and 058 for the relevant procedures for these bands.

 

For a full listing of the MAAA Manual of Procedures (MOP) click on the link below:

http://www.maaa.asn.au/maaa/mop.html

 

Each of the frequency bands is divided into individual assignments of 10kHz, however, due to the limitations of some radio control equipment a frequency spacing of greater than 10kHz may be required in practice. The MAAA Frequency Directives contain operating procedures and testing requirements to allow operation of equipment at specified frequency spacings. It should be stated that to operate at 10kHz spacing, more stringent requirements are placed on the users. If those controlling a particular flying area cannot or do not wish to comply with the 10kHz operating requirements, they shall use a minimum of 20kHz frequency separation between operating transmitters. In addition, at a flying area where 10kHz operation is permitted, an individual may choose to operate with a 20kHz or greater separation between transmitter frequencies.

The following rules apply to radio control equipment used for the control of model aircraft and operated by affiliated members of the M.A.A.A.

 

The following frequencies are approved for the radio control of models in Australia. The use of the 36 MHz band is restricted to the radio control of water-craft and aircraft. The frequencies marked with an asterisk may by law, be used only for the radio control of aircraft.

 

27 MHz EQUIPMENT POLICY

  1. INTRODUCTION The MAAA requires that any user of frequencies in the 27 MHz band complies with the requirements of the Australian Communications Authority (ACA) and the relevant Class licence, Radio communications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000. This is available from the ACA and is posted on their web site http://www.aca.gov.au/
  2. REQUIREMENTS (a) This approval only applies to model aircraft that are electric powered weighing no more than 500g and having a power source of no more than 9 volts. (b) The only approved model frequencies are those that are not used by CB radio. See table below. (c) The radio equipment used shall be capable of inter-operating at 50kHz frequency spacing. (d) All normal M.A.A.A. disciplines including club membership, flight line, frequency control, and flying areas apply. (e) Acceptance of the use of 27 MHz is not automatic and clubs have final discretion as to whether to allow it at their flying fields. (f) Clubs that agree to the use of 27 MHz are required to have a frequency control system. A Silvertone type system is preferred but, as there is no requirement for a bandwidth sensitive system, an alternative of a board with a peg for each frequency, which is removed and placed on the antenna of the transmitter when in use, would be acceptable.

 

Model Channel No Frequency MHz
Channel 1 26.995
Channel 2 27.045
Channel 3 27.095
Channel 4 27.145
Channel 5 27.195
The following is not permitted because it is on a frequency used by CB radio
Channel 6 27.255

 

29MHz

Channel No

Tx Frequency

Channel No

Tx Frequency

10

29.725

24

29.865

11

29.735

25

29.875

12

29.745

26

29.885

13

29.755

27

29.895

14

29.765

28

29.905

I5

29.775

29

29.915

16

29.785

30

29.925

17

29.795

31

29.935

18

29.805

32

29.945

19

29.815

33

29.955

20

29.825

34

29.965

21

29.835

35

29.975

22

29.845

36

29.985

23

29.855

37

29.995

 

36MHz

Channel

Frequency

Channel

Frequency

Channel

Frequency

601

36.010

621

36.210

641

36.410

602*

35.020

622*

36.220

642*

36.420

603

36.030

623

36.230

643

36.430

604*

36.040

624*

36.240

644*

36.440

605

36.050

625

36.250

645

36.450

606*

36.060

626*

36.260

646*

36.460

607

36.070

627

36.270

647

36.470

608*'

36.080

628*

36.280

648*

36.480

609

36.090

629

36.290

649

36.490

610*

36.100

630*

36.300

650*

36.500

611

36.110

631

36.310

651

36.510

612*

36.120

632*

36.320

652*

36.520

613

36.130

633

36.330

653

35.530

614*

36.140

634*

36.340

654*

36.540

615

36.150

635

36.350

655

36.550

616*

36,160

636*

36.360

656*

36.560

617

36.170

637

36.370

657

36.570

618*

36.180

638*

36.380

658*

36.580

619

36.190

639

36.390

659

36.590

620*

36.200

640*

36.400

 

 

Notes

1] The MAAA now permits 10kHz separation of adjacent transmitters but under very carefully controlled conditions. See the MAAA Frequency Directive for details. The new Silvertone Issue 7 Metric Keyboard (Yellow 25mm keys with wider spine) is mandatory for 10kHz operation. The old Imperial Issue 4 Keyboard (Blue 2 keys) must not be used for 10kHz operation.

2] To minimise the possibility of third order interference, pilots should stand at least three metres apart while flying their aircraft. An aircraft should not be operated closer than three metres from a transmitter other than its controlling transmitter.

3] Intermodulation in the receiver mixer arising from two transmitters spaced 450/460 kHz apart and operated simultaneously can occur in single conversion receivers of older designs. By and large modern 10kHz specified single conversion receivers are now relatively immune to this form of interference. However older FM receivers and certainly AM receivers may exhibit mixer intermodulation and therefore it is recommended where these types of receivers are in use, the Silvertone Keyboard be operated with those frequency slots above 645 be blocked off and Red keys used on the lower paired slots. See Issue 7 keyboard page for details. A simple field test will determine if this type of interference is present.

http://archive.acma.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/pc=PC_1285